Chicken with the Crumbs

My Children’s All-time Favorite Dinner Recipe

If I had to name the one recipe out of all my recipes that I have made more than any other, it would be my recipe for chicken with the crumbs.    When I was growing up, my mother made chicken for dinner every other Friday night in honor of the Jewish Sabbath.  She made two chicken recipes, and this recipe was one of them.  But my mother used a whole cut up chicken rather than cutlets, which I use.  I loved her chicken! Occasionally, we had leftovers, and I loved eating the chicken cold, too.  I will never forget the time that my mother packed a leftover piece of chicken for me to take to camp for lunch.  When I got to camp, I realized that I had left the lunch bag in the driveway.  To this day, I still haven’t gotten over the disappointment!  I was devastated, because I didn’t get to enjoy that 1 piece of leftover chicken for lunch.  Anyway, when I started making this recipe for my children, I realized that they didn’t enjoy eating chicken on the bone, so I adapted the recipe and switched over to cutlets.  This recipe quickly became my children’s favorite, and I definitely made it at least 2 times a week.  I can still hear either one of my sons, Danny or Benji saying to me, “Mommy, can we have chicken with the crumbs?”  I especially remember all the times I picked Benji up from his morning nursery school.  When we got home, Benji would go into the family room, and get real cozy in front of the tv to watch some of his favorite cartoons.  I’d say, “Benji do you want some leftover chicken with the crumbs?” Of course, I knew what the answer would be, so I’d fill up a plate with the chicken, and I loved bringing it to him.  He was my little prince.  Then years later, when Danny would come home from college, the first thing he asked me to make was of course, chicken with the crumbs.  I couldn’t make it fast enough for Danny. Please, try this recipe.  Your kids will be asking, “Mommy, can you make us some chicken with the crumbs?”

  • thin sliced chicken cutlets (I find that Purdue are the thinnest and the best)
  • Kellogg’s Corn Flakes Crumbs
  • oil (light olive oil, corn or canola)

Preheat oven to 400 degrees.  Cover a half sheet pan (or other baking pan with sides) with aluminum foil.  Grease the foil with a tablespoon or so of the oil.  Put some oil into a bowl- about 1/2 cup to start.  Then put all your cutlets into the oil.  Smoosh the chicken around in the oil.  Pour some corn flakes crumbs onto a large plate, about 3/4 cup to start with.  Take one cutlet out of the oil after you make sure the cutlet is coated on both sides, and lay it on the crumbs.  Turn the cutlet a few times, patting the crumbs on it.  I go pretty heavy with the crumbs, but you can go light if you wish.  Then, transfer the cutlet to your prepared sheet pan.  Repeat with all cutlets.  Then, drizzle the remaining oil from the bowl over the cutlets.  The cutlets only need a drizzling of oil on top.

Bake in center of preheated oven for about 20-25 minutes until chicken is cooked through.  If you are using thicker cutlets, I recommend you reduce the temperature to 375 degrees and cook about 30-35 minutes.  If you are using chicken pieces, I recommend cooking at 350 degrees for about an hour.

Note:  I usually use light olive oil when I make these because it’s healthier, but for the best flavor, I sometimes use corn oil.

Judy’s Melt in Your Mouth Jam Diagonal Cookies

Of all my cookie recipes I bake, this recipe is my daughter Randi’s favorite.  She loves them.  I like to make a batch of these cookies, wrap them up in aluminum foil, and deliver them to her as a loving care package.  She puts them in her freezer, and then takes one, two, or three out for a night time treat.  What makes these cookies special is the delicious, melt in your mouth, rich flavor of the cookie dough combined with the yummy jam. And these cookies look as good as they taste!

for the cookies:

  • 1/2 cup butter or margarine at room temperature (these cookies come out best if you use Fleischmann’s salted margarine)
  • 1/4 cup granulated sugar
  • scant 1 teaspoon of pure vanilla extract
  • 3/4 of 1 extra large egg yolk
  • about 1/4 teaspoon fresh lemon juice (Minute Maid lemon juice is just as good as fresh)
  • 1/8 teaspoon Kosher salt
  • 1 1/2 cups unbleached flour
  • jam or preserves (I use seedless raspberry, strawberry, or blackberry)

for the glaze:

  • 1/2 cup confectioners sugar mixed with 1 tablespoon of water (You can substitute a drop or two of lemon juice for some of the water)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Grease a large cookie sheet with butter or margarine, or put a piece of parchment paper on the cookie sheet.

In food processor fitted with the metal blade (you can do this in an electric mixer, too), cream margarine with sugar, then add vanilla and lemon juice, and pulse to mix. 

Add flour and salt.  Pulse until the mixture forms a ball.  If it is too wet to come together, add another tablespoon of flour.  Dump the dough onto a floured piece of wax paper or plastic wrap or onto a floured board. Divide the dough into 3 sections, quickly make each one into a ball, and wrap each in plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least one hour.  When you are ready to bake, take out one section of the dough.  Sprinkle a little flour on a board or counter.  Using your hands, roll the dough into a rope about 9-12 inches long.  It should be about 1  inch or so in diameter.  Then place the rope of dough on the parchment paper on your cookie sheet going horizontally.  Using your index finger, make a 1/2 inch hollow down the center of the rope.  Do not flatten the indentation too much, because that will cause the cookie to  will fall apart when you slice it.  Try to build the dough up on either side of the hollowed our area.  You want to do this, because the jam is going in that tunnel you are creating, and if the sides are not higher than the hollow, then the jam will run out.   

Fill the hollow with jam.  Repeat with the other two balls of dough.  Bake for about 20-25 minutes until you can see that the edges are golden brown, but not burned!  Let these cool right on the cookie sheet.  When they are cool, make the glaze.  Blend the confectioners sugar and the water with a wire whisk until smooth.  If the mixture is too thin, add a little more sugar.  If you think it is too thick, then thin it out with a drop more of water or a drop of lemon juice.  It should not look too watery.  Take a spoon, put some glaze in it, and just drizzle the glaze over the logs so they look pretty.  Let the glaze set for about 20 minutes.  Then, using a sharp knife, slice the cookies slightly on the diagonal about 3/4 inch to 1 inch thick.  Transfer them carefully with a metal spatula to your serving plate.  You can make these in advance as they freeze well.  If you are doing this, then transfer the cookies using a metal spatula to a sheet of heavy duty aluminum foil, wrap them up, and put them in a ziploc freezer bag.

Note:  The last time I made these, I used amazing jam which I bought in the supermarket, called Bonne Maman  Four Fruits Preserves which is a combination of raspberries, strawberries, red currants, and cherries.  The jam diagonals tasted incredible!

Judy’s Delectable Purim or Anytime Hamantaschen or Hamentashen

Triangle-Shaped Cookies with Jam in the Center

 Of all of my cookie recipes, this is probably my favorite one.  This was a recipe that I developed when my daughter Randi was going to  the wonderful Solomon Schechter Day School in Marlboro, New Jersey sometime around 1990.  Randi brought home a typed sheet of recipes for the Jewish holiday of Purim on a piece of pink paper from school (I still have and treasure that pink piece of paper).  I started experimenting with one of the recipes for hamantashen on the sheet.  I made some changes, including adding a touch of orange juice to the recipe.  I played with that recipe until it was perfect.  Back in those years, I loved the tradition on the holiday of Purim of putting together Shalach Manos (gifts of food), and delivering them to a few of my friends and family.  My gift platters always had some of my homemade chocolate chip cookies, some Hershey’s Kisses, and of course my homemade hamantaschen. My friends and family looked forward to receiving my homemade hamantaschen, but noone loved my hamantaschen more than Randi, Danny (my son), and, Nana (my mother).  My youngest son Benji only ate the hamantascen if I put chocolate chips in the center.  Every year as the holiday of Purim approaches, my children and my mother start asking me if I’m making my hamantaschen.   I try never to disappoint them.  Please, try this recipe.  I know that if you do, you will agree that the flavor of these cookies is out of this world!

  • 2 cups plus 2 tablespoons unbleached pre-sifted flour
  • 2 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/2 cup (1 stick) Fleischmann’s salted margarine at room temperature(if you keep your margarine in the freezer, just take it out, cut it into smallish pieces, and pulse it in processor, it will work just fine)
  • 1 extra large egg at room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
  • 1/4 cup scant  pure orange juice not use from concentrate (scant means a little less than)
  • jam or preserves (I usually use a variety of flavors, but my favorites are raspberry, strawberry, peach, cherry, blueberry, or apricot)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Either grease your cookie sheet with margarine or use a sheet of parchment paper.  I like to grease the pan, because I like how they come out with the bottoms and edges being a little browned, but using the parchment paper makes the job much easier.

Combine the dry ingredients- the flour, baking powder, and salt in a medium mixing bowl; set aside.

In bowl of food processor fitted with the metal blade (or alternately using a hand held mixer or a standing mixer fitted with the paddle attachment), cream margarine with sugar- if your margarine is frozen, just pulse it first.  Add the egg and vanilla, and pulse until blended.  Add the orange juice and pulse until blended.

Add dry ingredients all at once.  Pulse until a ball forms.  If the dough is too wet, and it won’t form a ball, add a little more flour, 1 or 2 tablespoons.  Dump the ball of dough out on a lightly floured board or table and flatten it slightly so that you can divide it into 3 sections.  Form each section into a flattish round disk, around an inch or so high.  Wrap each disk in plastic wrap or wax paper.  Refrigerate for at least 1 hour.

Take one disk out of refrigerator.  I usually do this on a sheet of wax paper.  Sprinkle some flour on the wax paper.  Put the disk of dough on the wax paper.  Turn the disk over.  Sprinkle some more flour on the wax paper before you put the dough back down.  The idea is to make sure that the dough  will not stick to the paper or your board.  Then roll the dough out to about 1/4 inch thickness.  Using a round cookie or biscuit cutter or the rim of a glass (I use a glass that has a diameter of about 2 1/2 to 3 inches), press down to make your circles.  Gather scraps and reroll them to make additional circles.  Transfer the circles of dough using a metal spatula onto your prepared cookie sheet spaced about 2 inches apart.  Put about a teaspoon of jam or preserves in the center of each circle.  Then bring the sides up and squeeze together to make your triangle-shaped cookies.  Pinch dough tightly enough so the seams are no longer visible and the sides are taught enought o prevent the cookies from leaking the filling as they bake.   You will get about 1 dozen or so cookies out of the one third of the dough.

Bake about 25-30 minutes until the hamentaschen are browned around the edges.  Let them cool a few minutes and then transfer them to a cooling rack.  Store them in an airtight container for 3 or 4 days.

Note:  You can use one third of the dough, and then leave the remaining dough in the refrigerator for a few days, and make the rest of the hamentaschen later.  Make sure you put your leftover dough which is already wrapped in plastic wrap or wax paper in a ziploc bag to keep it fresh.

Judy’s Famous Birthday Cake – My Family’s All Time Favorite Cake!

 Bake this incredible white cake with rich chocolate frosting for any special occasion! 

I have three children. Randi is my oldest; she’s 25 years old. Next is Danny- he’s 22. And last but definitely not least is Benji- he’s 18. When my children were little, I started the tradition of cooking a special birthday dinner for them, which of course had to include a birthday cake. I adapted this recipe from a recipe of my mother’s (Nana to my kids).   I have so many wonderful memories of all these birthday dinners that all ended with this amazing cake. The combination of the fluffy, buttery cake with the incomparable dark, glossy, chocolaty icing is so good, you will not be able to stop eating it! I know one thing for sure. To this day when I bake this cake, even though my kids are pretty much grown, they still fight over who’s going to get to lick the spatula or the bowl when I make the icing! I promise you – if you make this cake once for your family, you will want to start your own family tradition of making this cake for your children’s birthdays!

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